Ganemat Sekhon: Home range, father’s presence pushed Ganemat to create skeet history for India | More sports News


2021-03-22 05:51:03

NEW DELHI: At the end of medal ceremony, a request was made to teenager Ganemat Sekhon. “You have created history, and the media would love to hear from you.” The 20-year-old was almost surprised at the request. It might have been her first official press conference, but it was a befitting one, since she had become the first woman from India to win a skeet medal at the senior World Cups.
On Sunday, at the ongoing ISSF World Cup here, Chandigarh girl Ganemat shot her way into history books with a bronze medal in women’s skeet.
“It was just after I won it that I came to know [about the historic statistic]. It was overwhelming, like I was very excited, very happy,” said Ganemat, as she sat with India’s chief shotgun coach Mansher Singh.

Her father stood on the side, looking proudly at her daughter who had done what no other Indian woman had ever achieved before.
“I was working towards this. My aim was to qualify for the final for the first time in senior [World Cup]. Going on to win a medal is a very big thing,” she answered like a seasoned professional.
Before this, Ganemat had won a bronze medal at the 2018 Junior World Cup in Sydney. That also makes her the first woman skeet shooter from the country to be at the podium in both junior and senior World Cups.
She also has a 2019 Asian Championships silver medal to her name.

This is Ganemat’s third individual international medal – TOI Photo
“I think because it was the home range, I was very confident shooting here. I had my father behind me, and Mansher sir was also there supporting us throughout. The environment was very good…lot of plus points,” she said, admitting that playing at the Dr Karni Singh Shooting Range made a difference.
“We have the nationals, trials, everything is here.”
But she was nervous too.
“…because it was my first time in the senior final. I was nervous, was excited. There were too many emotions. But then I think, after the second round, I was actually in it. I thought this is an opportunity. I cannot let it go. That’s what got me going and I reached here,” she said.
Ganemat began by missing three targets in her first 10 shots, which left her in fifth place in the six-woman final. But she clawed her way back to finish in the top three with her final score of 40. Her tally in the qualification round was 117.

It was Ganemat’s maiden entry into a senior World Cup final – TOI Photo
The other Indian in the fray, Karttiki Singh Shaktawat, finished fourth.
Ganemat is coached by the Italian Piero Genga.
“We wished he could be here, but it wasn’t possible,” said Ganemat’s father, who is into farming and furniture designing.
Meanwhile, national shotgun coach Mansher said he tried to calm down Ganemat ahead of the medal round.
“We had quite a long talk before the final,” said Mansher, who joined his talented ward after a round of photographs following the medal ceremony. “I was basically easing her tension, keeping her relaxed, knowing that the build-up to the final can lead you to get a little tight in situations.
“Processes in the mind is what you can help them with.”

Ganemat, in picture, has a younger sister who wants to be a trap shooter – NRAI Photo
Karttiki began brilliantly to hold onto the top position after the first two rounds of ten shots each.
“I think Karttiki did an incredible job,” said Mansher. “There were a lot of plusses for her. Obviously she is young, yet to mature into a seasoned shooter. She is taking some time, but she has got a very strong will to fight. We saw that in the final. At one stage she was leading,” Mansher analysed.
Ganemat, on the other hand, admitted to having some butterflies in the stomach that led to her average start.
“I think it [the takeaway] was to be calm, not let the emotions take over,” said Ganemat.
But did the emotions actually take over at some point?
“Ya, at first they did,” she said, and a smile followed.





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